More content and features announced for Sky Kids service



A children's version of Sky's Duck Quacks Don't Echo and wildlife documentary series Big Cats, An Amazing Animal Family are among new content Sky is going to be offering young audiences as part of its development of its children's service Sky Kids.

Speaking at the Children’s Media Conference in Sheffield today, Sky’s Head of Kids Content Lucy Murphy is to announce that there will be even more exclusive kids content for Sky households and new features added to the dedicated Sky Kids app over the coming months.

Duck Quacks Don’t Echo: Kids from Magnum Media will combine science, amazing facts and wild experiments, wrapped up by Lee Mack’s comic genius. Big Cats, An Amazing Animal Family from Offspring Films, presented by Patrick Aryee will bring world class natural history storytelling to a younger audience.  

There are also plans for exclusive programming aimed at kids from Sky Sports to drive interest and encourage participation as well as exciting short form content from leading Multi-Channel Networks (MCNs) which will include nursery rhymes and music.

These new commissions will join the previously announced exclusive Sky original series featuring children’s TV legend Morph. Expected by the end of the year, they will sit alongside Sky’s existing selection of over 4,500 episodes of kids’ favourite shows from all the major networks including Nick Jr.’s Paw Patrol, Boomerang’s Scooby Doo, CBeebies’ Octonauts and Cartoon Network’s Adventure Time.   

The programmes are available on demand via the Kids section on the Sky home page on the traditional satellite-based service, as well through the NOW TV Kids Pass or through the Sky Kids app.

Since the Sky Kids app  launched in March, over 13 million episodes of kids TV shows have watched so far.  From 24 July, children will able to download their favourite shows to watch over and over again offline as part of an enhancement to the app.  Recently a new sleep mode function was added to the app, giving parents the ability to limit viewing time "improving the level of control they have over what their children watch and for how long", according to Sky.




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