A new look for Channel 4

Channel 4 has launched a new look, in its first major revamp in over 10 years.

Since 9pm, the channel has been teasing viewers with glimpses of the new look Channel 4 in the form of various presentation elements during programme junctions and commercial breaks.

At 9pm, ahead of Educating Cardiff, viewers saw a Channel 4 ident (pictured) representing a clock showing 9 o'clock surrounded by hundreds of blocks - the blocks that make up the famous Channel 4 logo.

The change marks the end of the previous look, the oldest of all of the main networks, which was introduced in 2004 and featured short sequences that showed the Channel 4 logo forming among the likes of motorway signs, a London housing estate and within electricity pylons.

The first clue of an impending change came when the previously 3D logo for the channel that appeared on various catch-up players and TV platforms was replaced with a flat version of the logo.

The new logo also appears on the HD version of the channel (pictured).

As the evening progressed, Channel 4 unveiled more of its new look. In a story that spanned the ad breaks, Channel 4 appeared to take viewers to the land where the Channel 4 blocks originate, where viewers where introduced to a strange dancing lady (below). In the next video shown in the following ad break, the Channel 4 blocks were shown being mined. By the end of Educating Cardiff, the blocks were being processed and refined, as shown in this YouTube video.

From the land of the Channel 4 blocks....  a very abstract start to Channel 4's new look


Predictably, the unveiling of the new look Channel 4 was greeted with bemusement, confusion and an overall mixed response on social media. But with privatisation looming, it's unclear how long the channel, which was set up in 1982 with a specific remit to provide alternative programming, will stay in its current form.

And this is what Chris Bovill and John Allison, Heads of 4Creative have  to say:
“Most TV branding these days is like watching wallpaper. It’s pleasant but gets boring very quickly. 
However, Channel 4 is much more than just a big shiny number and some nice vibes.
We didn’t want to tell people what channel they’re watching. We wanted to tell them why they’re watching it the first place. They watch because Channel 4 stands for something important. We wanted the new branding to reflect this. 
We started with the original, iconic Lambie Nairn 4 logo and broke it down into its constituent parts; the nine blocks. The blocks represent Channel 4’s incredibly diverse qualities. The blocks are free to demonstrate our remit; to be irreverent, innovative, alternative and challenging. They are free to flow through everything on the channel: our typeface, on-screen menus, on-screen graphics, off-air logo, Channel 4 News, Channel 4 Racing, all the way through to the idents. 
The idents present the blocks as kryptonite-like. They tell the story of their origin and how they have a powerful impact on the world around them. Just as Channel 4 does. It is a story that we shall build on. 
It’s been an incredible honour to work on such a loved brand, a brand very close to our hearts. Hopefully we haven’t let the viewers down.”









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1 comments:

  1. All I want from a refresh of the branding is for them to remove the DOG, that damned picture corruption top left of my screen.

    ReplyDelete

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