DAB station updates - Foyle, Kiss and Eurovision

There are a number of DAB digital radio changes, including the addition of a further BBC Radio service in Northern Ireland, a change to Kiss in South Essex and details about the forthcoming BBC Radio 2 Eurovision service:

In Northern Ireland, BBC Radio Foyle, broadcast from Derry/Londonderry is on the Northern Ireland local DAB multiplex, which already carries BBC Radio Ulster. BBC Radio Foyle broadcasts with 128kbps bandwidth.

In South Essex, Kiss is being removed from local DAB, in line with similar changes across the UK since Kiss started broadcasting as a national station on DAB. Listeners who access the 'local DAB' version of Kiss will see scrolling text on the display about the changes. Affected listeners should reset their DAB presets. The national version of Kiss is in mono, but some listeners in South Essex should be able to receive the stereo signal version from London DAB.

Across the UK, the BBC's National DAB multiplex will be reconfigured to allow extra space for BBC Radio 2 Eurovision, which will broadcast between Thursday 21st May and Sunday 24th May inclusive. As a result:
  • The BBC's 7 day DAB EPG will not be available from Wednesday 20th May until Monday 25th May. 
  • The Daily Service from BBC Radio 4 LW on Friday 22nd May will not be carried on BBC DAB.
  • BBC Radio 1, 1Xtra, 2 and 6 Music will run on a slightly lower bitrate of 112kbps stereo. BBC Radio 2 Eurovision will appear in 64kbps mono.
BBC Radio 2 Eurovision via DAB should automatically appear in the station list if the DAB radio is tuned to another BBC National station, such as BBC Radio 2. In a small number of cases, listeners will need to autotune their DAB set. The display name for the station is either BBC R2Eur or BBC R2Eurovision, depening on the type of DAB radio used.



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1 comments:

  1. Why on earth is this fiasco being carried out again this year? The overwhelming majority of people interested in the song contest will watch it on the TV. Those that want to listen on the radio or if they out are driving in their car will listen via Radio 2 FM so who is this 64Mbps being directed at? Where are the listeners who are going to get an improved service compared to listening on FM?

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