[ARCHIVE] Where are the extra Freeview HD channels going to be available?

REFERENCE
Ofcom has earmarked up to 30 transmitter sites that will carry an extra 10 Freeview HD channels over two multiplexes. The regulator has published a map of the transmitter sites, plus details of the frequencies (UHF channels) that the extra services will use:


The 30 transmitter sites are highlighted with green dots on the above map. The other transmitters are those sites that currently offer the full set of Freeview channels but will not offer the extra HD channels.

Ofcom has specified that the new multiplexes should cover at 50% of the population, with at least 25% population coverage in the Nations (Wales, Scotland, Northern Ireland).

Here is further information on which sites will carry the extra services, which UHF channel number they will be on and at what power (Effective Radiated Power) these services will be transmitted at.

NOTE: These extra services will be broadcast at lower power than the current Freeview service. Therefore, viewers living in fringe areas of the transmitters selected for the extra HD channels may not be able to receive the extra channels when they launch.

UPDATE 12/11/2013:  Some of the information in the table below with regards Multiplex 7 (COM7), notably "ERP (kW)" (power levels) has been superseded. Please see the "Freeview HD transmitters and frequencies" pages for current information.


Transmitter Site
Region
Multiplex 7
Multiplex 8
UHF ch.
ERP (kW)
UHF ch.
ERP (kW)
Crystal Palace
London
33
15.6
35
13.5
Winter Hill
North West
31
14.0
37
14.0
Sutton Coldfield
West Midlands
33
6.4
35
8.3
Craigkelly
Central Scotland
33
2.3
34
3.0
Black Hill
Central Scotland
32
9.4
35
12.5
Divis
Northern Ireland
33
4.4
34
3.4
Pontop Pike
North East
33
9.5
34
9.5
Rowridge*
South
31
25.0
37
25.0
Wenvoe
South East Wales
31
4.2
37
12.2
Bilsdale
North East
31
5.0
37
5.0
Waltham
East Midlands
31
1.4
37
1.4
Hannington
South
32
10.0
34
10.0
Belmont
Lincolnshire & E Yorks
33
15.4
35
15.4
Oxford
South Midlands
31
5.8
37
5.8
Tacolneston
Anglia
31
10.0
37
10.0
Ridge Hill
Herefordshire, N Gloucs
32
4.2
34
4.2
Emley Moor
Yorkshire
32
16.7
34
16.7
Mendip
West
33
17.5
35
17.5
Sandy Heath
Anglia
32
8.4
34
8.4
Durris
Scotland
32
12.5
35
12.9
Angus
Scotland
31
4.5
37
4.5
Bluebell Hill
South East
32
1.4
34
1.4
Sheffield
Yorkshire
31
0.2
37
0.2
Moel-y-Parc
North East Wales
32
7.3
34
5.0
Caldbeck
Cumbria, Dumfries
32
5.4
35
3.6
Caradon Hill
South West
31
10.5
37
2.5
Beacon Hill
South West
33
4.3
34
1.0
Darvel
Scotland
31
2.6
37
2.6
Fenton
West Midlands
32
0.14
34
0.14
Fenham
North East
31
0.08
37
0.08

* It will upto Arqiva to decide if the extra multiplexes from Rowridge will be transmitted using vertically or horizontally polarised. Since digital switchover, Rowridge also broadcasts services in vertical polarisation, which reduces the effects of co-channel interference from horizontally polarised services transmitted from France, Crystal Palace and Stockland Hill.


Article orignally published in February, re-published 16/07/2013 with updated information.


See Also:
Where has the BBC found space for the extra HD channels? >
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5 comments:

  1. It should be pointed out that no transmitter will transmit at equal power with existing SD services and coverage will be substantially lower, lower even than pre-switchover digital at many sites. They will also not be equal between the two multiplexes (have we not learned from the original mistakes of 1998?)

    This assumes that whoever wins the licence uses Arqiva's latest proposal, which is based on reuse of existing transmit antennas (where possible) and old analogue or pre-switchover digital transmitter hardware. That's the basis for Ofcom's coverage figures.

    The difference in power, compared to the PSB muxes, varies from -4.38 dB (Moel-y-Parc layer 7) to -16.02 dB (Caradon Hill layer 8). The average cut is just over 10 dB, and the standard deviation 2.74 dB, for layer 7, and a little more for layer 8.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Lower power does not automatically mean less coverage. It also depends on the transmission mode used and the amount of error correction used. You can get more coverage by sacrificing some data bandwidth.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are right in that modes and error correction rates can affect coverage, and in fact the local TV multiplexes will be using that to their advantage.

      However, according to the information released today, the new multiplexes will use the same parameters as the current high-powered Freeview HD multiplex.

      Delete
  3. Would all "ACS" (Additional Cordinated Stations) transmitters e.g. Bristol Ilchester Crescent (An ACS of Mendip - BBC West) get Mux 7 and 8?

    Additionally wouldn't better utilisation of frequencies using 31,33, 35 and 37 UK wide be better as SFNs to provide 4 Muxs

    Freesat ultimately is the future particular with 4G+. Freeview do need to explore national SFNs with transmitters sites having an local MUX with upto 4 local streams (BBC One West, BBC Two England (though only need 4 national variations), ITV1/STV/UTV West and an "Local Station" e.g. Made in Bristol! - leaving all other SFN MUXs Nationally in theory!

    Local TV such as Made in Bristol and Made in Cardiff coverage on regional transmitters like Wenvoe/Mendip both could have better names (West of England TV and South Wales TV) as other cities also fall into the catchment such as Newport and Bath!

    ReplyDelete
  4. V Sorry to rake-up old post, but this is an interesting topic.

    The UK broadcast environment has the need to support local (ie sub-regional), national and macro-regional services.

    If the muxes were arranged as one local/sub-regional multi-frequency (MFN) mux, with the rest as single-frequency SFN's, there would still be a requirement to implement variations for Channels 4, 5 S4c/BBC Alba and BBC2. If these were supported by a macro-regional SFN, the frequency take need not be high, depending on granularity two or three UHF channels.

    If one assumes (OK rashly) that advances in coding creativity and statmux dynamics could give you five services per statmuxed DVB-T2 service after the protection period is elongated to allow for SFN, then a macro-regional mux could be deployed to support BBC2, Channel 4, Five , S4c/etc, and one other.

    The local/sub-regional mux need only support BBC1, ITV, The HD version of the local licensee and one other. As an MFN the protection ratio could remain where it is, allowing support of 4 HD services without statmux.

    ReplyDelete

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